Archive for February, 2012

February 28, 2012

Lord Robert Bruce

Painted at the age of seven by Cornelius Johnson in 1635. The young lord wears a silk doublet richly decorated with silver thread, blue ribbons and silver points. Just a plain falling band, but he doesn’t need anything showy with this doublet.

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February 28, 2012

A Seventeenth Century Chav

A Picture of an English Antick with a list of His Ridiculous Habits and Apish Gestures, printed in November 1646. Helpfully the author has annotated the picture for us, (see below). Number 15 could apply in 2012!

February 28, 2012

The Fame, Wit and Glory of the West

Nice pair of woodcuts from a broadside printed in 1649. The blocks look well used, but the costume style is definitely 1640s. The two figures are wearing good quality civilian clothes, the man has laced falling band, braided wings on his doublet and an off-the-shoulder  cloak, swept rakishly across his chest. Also a good pair of well heeled shoes with rosette ties. The lady is tidily attired with decorated kerchief, coif and apron, front lacing bodice and stout shoes.

February 27, 2012

Warlike Directions or the Souldier’s Practice

Military manual by Thomas Fisher, printed in 1642. The previous woodcut appears in this book as does this, almost identical image, though this time the musketeer/dragoon is not armed to the teeth. More of the odd ties here which begin to look like points or laces through to the breeches, though the style of his coat is really too late for points. The ghost musket is a bleed through from the next page. It has been suggested that these images are meant to reflect the part time soldiers of the Trayned Bandes of London.

February 27, 2012

Military and Spiritual Motions

……for foote companies, by Captaine Lazarus Howard of Ailsford in Kent. This is the picture on the front page of Captaine Howard’s pamphlet, printed in London,  1645. The musketeer has a plain square cut coat and close fitting breeches with a pot helmet, falling band (darted). He may have been a dragoon as he wears long boots with spurs and boothose. All the accoutrements of a musketeer are present, and a nice example of a matchlock musket.

February 27, 2012

A Declaration of a Strange and Wonderful Monster

Born in Kirkham Parish in Lancashire, March 3rd 1645, according to George Thomason’s annotation on the front cover. One of those “World Turned Upside Down” moralising stories about a deformed stillborn infant whose mother had badmouthed the Parliamentarians and as such was thought to have been punished with a monster for a child. The images are a bit cartoonish, but nevertheless it’s reliably dateable and there are a few decent costume details.

February 24, 2012

Colonel Robert Hammond

Painted by by Cornelis Janssens van Ceulen, also known as Cornelius Johnson. This Colonel Hammond wasn’t the one who was for a while govenor of Carisbrooke Castle and jailor of Charles I whilst he was kept there before being moved to London for trial, but actually a Royalist officer from Kent who took part in the Kentish rising of the second civil war in 1646.  Smart lace edged band and a lot of braid decorating his doublet. The Colonell also wears an ebrroidered orange scarf around his waist. His example is not plain, but finely embroidered. Portrait hangs in Canterbury. Thanks to Jan Toms for pointing out my mistake.

February 24, 2012

Colonell Alexander Popham

Parliamentary member and Colonell of the Littlecote garrison painted on a horse in 1650 by an unknown artist. This painting hangs in the National Armies Museum in Leeds. Notice how he has tied his large falling band so it doesn’t flap around as he’s riding.

February 21, 2012

A Merry New Ballad…

..both pleasant and sweet, In praise of the Blacksmith which is very meete. To the tune of Greensleeves etc. Broadside first published in 1635. The two smiths are wearing some kind of work overalls or aprons. The guy on the left, seems to have a knitted monmouth, at least going by the shape and the bobble. The smith on the right has what looks very much like an embroidered day cap with lace edging.

February 21, 2012

The English Irish Soldier

“With his new Discipline, new armes, old stomach, and new taken pillage, who would rather eate than fight.” Satirical cartoon and broadside from 1641. It’s cartoonish and suggesting that all English soldiers are thieves, but the his coat is spot on, buttons closely spaced all the way down, small shoulder wings and two piece sleeves with turnbacks. Big darted band for a collar.