Daniel Goodricke by unknown artist

Painted in 1634, Daniel Goodrick had just returned from the Thirty Years War and was yet to rise to the rank of Sergeant Major in the Parliament army. He is a confection of several colours. Bright red breeches and almost completely braided slashed sleeves, (through which you can see his shirt and the red lining) on his doublet under a leather buffcoat with braided seams. The falling band shows off a wide edge of bobbin lace over a metal gorget. On his hip he holds a red blocked hat with ostrich plumes, and hanging from a black sash is the Order of Gustavus Adolphus. This painting is owned by the York Museums Trust

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2 Comments to “Daniel Goodricke by unknown artist”

  1. Interesting that his buffcoat is constructed like a doublet, the waistline height and curve is in keeping and reminiscent of the doublets of the mid to late 1620s, his tabs do not follow suit however.

    I rarely see tabs like this and have only come across them on very similar looking buffcoats. I assume the large overlapping tabs are to cover as much as the lower upper body as possible so as to offer as much protection possible? It is a military coat after all!

  2. Interesting that his buffcoat is constructed like a doublet, the waistline height and curve is in keeping and reminiscent of the doublets of the mid to late 1620s, his tabs do not follow suit however.

    I rarely see tabs like this and only tend to come across them on very similar looking buffcoats. I assume the large overlapping tabs are to cover as much of the lower upper body as possible so as to offer as much protection possible? Then again it’s construction and ornamentation leads me to believe it’s not a overtly practical military coat.

    Buffcoats were sought after as symbols of status in the 1630s and 40s were they not??

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