A Seasonable Lecture

or, A most learned oration disburthened from Henry VValker, a most judicious … iron monger : a late pamphleteere and now, too late or too soone, a double diligent preacher : as it might be delivered in Hatcham barne the thirtieth day of March last. Taken in short writing by Thorny Ailo ; and now printed in words at length and not in figures. Printed in London 1642.

Henry Walker started as an ironmonger in London and gradually moved into writing and selling books from the City. He was also known as a charismatic, though not necessarily learned preacher. Interesting to note that this lecture was taken down in shorthand and then translated into print for publication. Some of the most popular sermons were reprinted in the 1640s particularly, though it was a required skill to pay attention and remember the sermon you had attended, every much as it was for the sermon giver to deliver from memory.

In the top image from the pamphlet we see a group of respectable citizens paying close attention to Henry in his tub. Henry wears a preaching gown and falling band, whilst his flock are tidily dressed in doublet, breeches and fine linen. The ladies in petticoat, apron and kerchief. All apart from the preacher are wearing hats, though it was thought that it was best by those of an independant persuasion to uncover to hear the word delivered.  In the lower pane two gents are seen abroad in cloaks and carrying staffs. Perhaps they are pilgrims, or maybe a scene from the parable of Tobias and Gabriel he relates in the sermon.

If you want to learn more about Henry Walker, the best place to look in is Nick Poyntz’s blog Mercurius Politicus.

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4 Comments to “A Seasonable Lecture”

  1. Look at the work of Michael Mendle on short-hand stenography and the 1640s.

  2. Much, much more on this amazing character, Henry Walker, at Nick’s page. He really knows everything there is to know about Walker:
    http://mercuriuspoliticus.wordpress.com/henry-walker/
    http://mercuriuspoliticus.wordpress.com/tag/henry-walker/

  3. Good point Brodie. I’ve added a link in the text too.

  4. “He really knows everything there is to know about Walker”

    Sadly there is a lot left for me to find out – have only got up to 1642 in the biography I’m trying (mostly failing) to write…

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