Posts tagged ‘doublet’

August 13, 2013

Sir John Pennington

This portrait was painted by Gerard Soest sometime during the war. Sir John was Admiral of the Fleet to Charles I which meant that he wasn’t over taxed for the most past of  the civil war, because by the time he had returned with the Queen from the Continent, the King had lost most of the navy to Parliament. He did manage to maintain a fleet in the Bristol Channel for a time but that was about the extent of Sir John’s war.

He is pictured in front of a naval engagement in black day cap and back and breastplate over a grey silk doublet. His matching scarf is tied around the waist and patterned with gold threads. He’s also wearing a plain band with a bunch of grapes tassel on the bandstring.

 

I can’t find the whereabouts of the portrait. it was exhibited in the 1800s but since then has disappeared. I presume it is in private hands.

 

Sir John Pennington

August 9, 2013

Richard Boyle 1st Earl of Burlington

Painted by Anthony van Dyck shortly before the war. This picture hangs in the National Portrait Gallery and shows the Royalist officer in casual mood with the top of his doublet open, showing the linen of his shirt and the attached falling band with a nice edge of lace. Boyle fought in the war mainly in Ireland but with little distinction according to his biographer on the Oxford Dictionary of Biography.

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July 22, 2013

Pelham Corbet

Painted in or around 1634 by John Souch, Pelham fought in the civil war for the royalist side and was captured at Shrewsbury. Here he is pictured in a fine embroidered or brocade white doublet, (although the sleeves could be separate and held in place by the parti-coloured strings on his shoulders) a long buffcoat with silver decoration, red breeches with pointed decoration, and a fine pair of white, soft leather high-heeled boots. He also has a fine feathered hat, a nice pair of gauntlets, a wide gorget around his neck and he is holding a leading staff, the kind of polearm that looks good but actually isn’t that much use on the field of battle. It’s a badge of rank rather than a weapon. The portrait is held somewhere in an unnamed private collection.

Pelham Corbet John Souch

July 15, 2013

Ferdinando Fairfax

Painted by Edward Bower, sometime before he died of an infection resulting from a gangrenous foot in 1648. Ferdinando second Lord Fairfax of Cameron was member of parliament for Boroughbridge and fought on the side of Parliament during the war. His son Thomas was the famous parliamentary commander. He has put aside his armour in this picture and seemingly embraced peace in his civilian clothes, although it could also symbolise the fact that he was relieved of army duties by the Self Denying Ordinance of December 1644. He is wearing a sleeved cloak which has a complicated arrangement of buttons and loops allowing it to be worn as a coat or a cloak with a hanging collar which you can see unbuttoned on his right side. Presumably it’s just about to fall off. He’s wearing it over a white doublet with plain cuffs and band of good quality linen. The portrait hangs in the York Museums Trust collection.

Ferdinando, 2nd Lord Halifax

July 9, 2013

The English Gentleman and Gentlewoman

The front page engraving by William Marshall to the third edition of Richard Braithwaite’s book published in 1641, basically a guide to what was acceptable behaviour. It wasn’t a small book. As the author said in his introduction:

“I had purposed that this work should have been digested into a portable volume, to the end it might bee more familiar with a Gentleman’s pocket, not to pick it, but that hee might picke some good from it: But since the Volume would not beare it, you must with patience beare with it, and with more trouble beare it, by inlarging your pocket to contain it.”

There are loads of details here worth looking at.

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The gentlewoman is wearing long skirts to her petticoat, a tabbed bodice, a fine layered kerchief and a ribbon in her dressed hair.

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The gentleman has a tall hat, wide falling band, short doublet and breeches with a splendid pair of boots. He is also sporting a fine coat with turned back cuffs in an off the shoulder manner, though notice that his falling band is arranged over the coat.

 

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This ragged fellow contemplating a tortoise in the garden is more modestly dressed in a plain doublet, breeches and shoes.

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Here is a selection of smartly dressed gentle-women, in petticoats, bodices and a variety of kerchief styles.

 

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And this lady is wearing what I can only describe as a “nursing smock”, split to the waist and pulled open for use. What it does reveal though, apart from the obvious is the pleats on her petticoat waistline.

 

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July 4, 2013

Sir Humphrey Style

the first and last Baronet Style painted by an artist from the circle of Adrien Hanneman at an unknown date, though obviously from the period. This painting came up for sale at Christies in London in 2012. Sir H is wearing  a sumptuous doublet, probably made from silk velvet. Notice the way the artist has painted the way it catches the light, this is very characteristic of that kind of fabric. Just a plain falling band though I don’t think he needs anything more fancy.

Humphrey Style, 1st Baronet (c1596-1659)  *oil on canvas  *76 x 63.8 cm

 

 

The buttons are not painted in detail, just a few brush strokes, but they look like woven thread ones with some gold bullion thread included in the weave..

 

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June 25, 2013

A Description

Of the Passage of THOMAS late Earle of STRAFFORD, over the River of Styx, with the conference betwixt him, CHARON, and WILLIAM NOY. A small eight page satire written by an anonymous author in 1641 after the execution of Strafford. William Noy was a lawyer who was associated in the popular consciousness with the King’s attempt to raise money without calling parliament by reinstating ancient crown rights for financial gain. He had in fact just been doing his job, but by 1641 he was dead, and he is pictured on the other side of the river Styx waiting for Strafford’s arrival. Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Strafford had been caught up in the political wranglings between King and Parliament and basically was sacrificed by Charles in a vain (as it turned out) attempt to keep the peace.

Noy is wearing a tabbed doublet, breeches and a heavy cloak over all and possibly a ruff that seems to have been as much a lawyer’s uniform then as a wig is now. Strafford looks to be clothed in a similar fashion though his hat seems smarter somehow. Charon the legendary ferryman to Hades of Greek myth has a doublet presumably and an odd almost brimless tall crowned hat.

 

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June 25, 2013

The English Improver Improved Part 2

Further into the 1652 book on agriculture and husbandry there are two more interesting illustrations. On page 65 we see the author Walter Blith with his surveying instruments and further on a labourer demonstrating a spade amongst pictures of other tools.

Walter is dressed in a quality doublet with slashed sleeves, beribboned unconfined breeches and some splendid soft riding boots. The sleeves of his shirt appear to be gathered into a small cuff but pulled through the ends of his shortened doublet sleeves to emphasise the amount of linen used. He’s also wearing a jauntily cocked hat and some kind of wrap around his stomach that is possibly artistic licence as it looks more classical than Early Modern. I’m not sure how you’d stop something like that from falling down. He’s not dressed for surveying I suspect. This is the supervisor at work.

 

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And on page 69 an echo of the labourer on the frontispiece using what we are now told is a trenching spade. Sadly he’s ditched (no pun intended) his intriguing hat and unbuttoned his coat but we can now see better details of the breeches that are gathered at the knee and count the number of buttonholes on a working man’s doublet. Notice for a working man in the dirt he’s actually wearing shoes, not boots. His left hose seems to have a clock, (or gusset) in the front of the foot. They are usually found on the side. Interesting.

 

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June 19, 2013

John Evelyn

The famous writer and diarist painted in 1641 by the Flemish artist Hendrick van der Borcht the Younger, possibly when Evelyn was in the Low Countries with Mary the Princess Royal. He returned in 1642 in time to witness the Battle of Brentford but soon went back to the continent to continue his Grand Tour, returning after the war. From what we can see in the picture, John is wearing a black slashed doublet with a linen shirt beneath and a falling band with cutwork lace around the edge. The picture is in a private collection but is on permanent loan to the National Portrait Gallery. © National Portrait Gallery, London 2013

John Evelyn 1641

And here is a close up detail of the lace on his band and the strings attached.

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June 14, 2013

The Poore Orphan’s Court or Orphan’s Cry

Tract from 1636 published in London that addressed the problem of homeless children begging in the streets. The solution proposed was that “Every ship that goes to Virginia to carry sixe boyes and sixe girles, every one to carry the like to New England” so that they could work on the plantations. An innovative solution, though I have no idea if it ever came to fruition. However the picture on the front page is very arresting and looks very similar to the Callot engravings of beggars from the continent. All the children are in rags, though still in doublet and breeches (the boys) or waistcoat with petticoat skirts (the girls).

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Here are some closer details

 

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The boy on the right appears to be shod in what might originally have been startup boots, though it’s hard to tell for sure.

 

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The boy on the right has a very battered felt hat on his head.

 

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